Author: Meghan Broadbent, MS

Predicting the Need for Extrication in Traffic Accidents Reported to 911: Is Anyone Pinned/Trapped?

Download Original Paper Extrication activities at the scene of motor vehicle accidents (MVA) result in extended scene times and increase morbidity and mortality. Identifying the need for extrication-capable resources during the 911 call-taking process, and dispatching them without delay, is crucial to delivering the required response and patient care. Determining the need for extrication using the Traffic/Transport Incidents Protocol in the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®) (version 13.0 ©2000-2015, Priority Dispatch, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA)...

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Is Emergency Medical Dispatcher Low-Acuity Code Selection Influenced by a User-Interface Software Modification?

Sick Person (Specific Diagnosis) is one of the most commonly used Chief Complaint Protocols in the Medical Priority Dispatch System™. Within the Sick Person Protocol, the 26-A-1 coding represents a group of patients with no specific identifiable complaint. This vague categorization presents a problem for dispatch systems and EMS responders alike, since so little is captured about the patient’s true condition. s: The objective of this study was to determine whether changing the order of the “No” answer choice on the...

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Weapons Reported On-Scene by Callers to Emergency Police Dispatch

Providing information about possible weapons on scene is an essential objective of police dispatching and clearly valuable to officer safety. However, up to now, no information has been available about how often callers report weapons as “involved or mentioned” in an incident, what types of weapons are most commonly reported, or which incident types most commonly have reported weapons associated with them. : The primary objective of this study is to determine which types of weapons are reported most often and on which Police Priority Dispatch System (PPDS®)...

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