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Editors Letters

Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI

Sep 07, 2021|AEDR 2021 Vol. 9 Issue 2|Editors Letters

What’s next for the First, First Responder? Since that term was first coined decades ago by Dr. Jeff Clawson in the nascent years of emergency medical dispatch development, much has changed. One of the biggest changes is the expanded role of the emergency telecommunicator in general—not simply the role of the emergency medical dispatcher (EMD), who was the subject of the earliest efforts to professionalize emergency telecommunicators with formal training and continuing education...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI

Jun 22, 2021|AEDR 2021 Vol. 9 Issue 1|Editors Letters

Since our last issue was released in early January 2021, we have moved into a new stage of the COVID-19 pandemic—one of great promise, but also new dangers. It has been said by numerous epidemiological experts that we are now in a race to vaccinate enough of the population to stem the disease spread, before new and more potent virus variants threaten to ravage the world. Weathering more than a year of this pandemic makes it truly remarkable that so many dispatch agencies continue to perform at...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI

Jan 20, 2021|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 3|Editors Letters

As we begin a new year and close the books on 2020, uncertainty, disruption, and stressful conditions continue all around us. Public safety and public health services have been pushed to their extremes throughout much of the last year. The fallout from this extended effort, with all its accompanying tension and strain, will surely be studied for years to come. Yet even before this current crisis existed, emergency telecommunicators faced many challenges. In this issue, two groups of...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI

Oct 01, 2020|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 2|Editors Letters

So far, it's been a year like no other—and that has been especially true for emergency dispatch agencies and the responders for which they dispatch. While the COVID-19 outbreak is far from over, it appears that emergency services and public safety agencies have adjusted to our new normal quite effectively—albeit still with much uncertainty about the future. In coming issues, we expect to publish more on the pandemic as new research is completed and more cases of interest become available. However, for now, we are temporarily setting...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-In-Chief

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI

Jun 03, 2020|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 1|Editors Letters

As I write this from my workplace office—realizing I'm one of only a few people in our organization who's not working from home this week—I feel it's important to recognize that most emergency dispatchers don't get to choose the work-from-home option. If that's you, then you know the drill; you must brave going out of the house, working side-by-side with your co-workers, practicing social distancing the best you can, wearing your mask whenever possible, disinfecting your workspace frequently, and enduring all the other risks...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-In-Chief

Isabel Gardett, PhD

Mar 04, 2020|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 3|Editors Letters

When I was eight or nine years old, my dad gave me a copy of the book Anguished English, by Richard Lederer. The book was a compilation of puns, jokes, and double meanings, mostly accidental, that Lederer spotted in the world around him. Often these came from headlines, news articles, or ads. A lot of the jokes depended on one word that could mean two different things-or different words with meanings that were similar, but not quite the same. The book was incredibly funny to me as a child, but the confusion caused by the double meanings...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-In-Chief

Isabel Gardett, PhD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Editors Letters

There's a line from a science fiction novel that, to me, captures the drama of applied research. In William Gibson's 2003 novel Pattern Recognition, an unknown person or persons are publishing video fragments online one at a time—pieces of a larger story, discovered at random on hidden sites on the internet. Taken together, these fragments are known as "the footage." In the book, whole online forums are devoted to discovering who is publishing the videos and why. One of the ongoing debates concerns "progressives" versus "completists"...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Isabel Gardett, PhD

Apr 09, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 1|Editors Letters

In gem cutting, a "facet" is one of the cut faces that causes the gem to shine and sparkle. But facets don't just reflect light. In the words of the International Gem Society, facets "control the entry and exit of light" from the gem. In other words, cutting a new facet—seeing or finding a new angle on the stone—allows the viewer to literally see further into its depths. It's an enchanting idea, and one that, surprisingly enough, applies to this issue of AEDR. In 2013, in the second issue ever of AEDR, we published a literature review...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Isabel Gardett, PhD

Dec 03, 2018|AEDR 2018 Vol. 6 Issue 3|Editors Letters

When I was younger, I spent a lot of time at science fairs—so much time, in fact, that two of the three new cars my parents bought during my childhood were purchased while I was busy presenting three-sided foamcore posters to skeptical rounds of judges. My favorite project was the one I did in fourth grade. I wanted to find out whether heated gels were stronger or weaker than cold ones. In other words, would heating or cooling my bubble-blowing syrup help me make bigger bubbles? It was a great project. It was messy and required me to...

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Welcome Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Isabel Gardett, PhD

Aug 23, 2018|AEDR 2018 Vol. 6 Issue 2|Editors Letters

The time to beat is 17 years. We think we can blow it out of the water. In 2011, a group of researchers from Cambridge University compiled studies on research "lags"—the time it takes to convert research findings into useful patient care applications—and found that the average was 17 years. That's 17 years to go from a discovery in the lab to care for a patient, 17 years from studying a phenomenon to saving a life, 17 years from having an insight about care to implementing it. The broader term for the movement from research findings to practice is "translational science," which can include...

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