Topic: police

Tell Me Why with Steve Zenes

https//media.blubrry.com/aedr_podcast/p/content.blubrry.com/aedr_podcast/Episode_44-2019-02-05-SteveZenes_mixdown.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 32:35 — 29.8MB) | EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS | MoreIsabel talks with Steve Zenes, 911 Operations Coordinator with the Morris County Communications Center. They discuss how police dispatch is different from fire and EMS, why “Tell me exactly what happened” matters, and...

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Evaluating the Effect of Proper Use of “Tell Me Exactly What Happened” Case Entry Questions on Chief Complaint Selection and Information Gathering at Emergency Police Dispatch

The most critical and difficult part of the Emergency Police Dispatcher’s (EPD) job may be the gathering of the initial problem description, which uses a scripted Protocol Case Entry Question (CEQ) but also requires interpretation on the part of the EPD. Specifically, at the beginning of the call, the EPD asks the caller the CEQ “Ok, tell me exactly what happened” (TMEWH). Based on the caller’s response, the EPD selects a Chief Complaint (CC) Protocol—a specific protocol that...

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Police Research Academy with Chris Knight and Meghan Broadbent

https//media.blubrry.com/aedr_podcast/p/content.blubrry.com/aedr_podcast/Episode04-2017-09-15-ChrisKnight-MeganBroadbent_mixdown.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 34:14 — 47.0MB) | EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS | MoreIsabel Gardett talks with Chris Knight, a member of the Police Council of Standards for the International Academies of Emergency Dispatch (IAED), and Meghan Broadbent, a research data analyst for IAED. They...

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Research and the Realities of Police Dispatch

The reality of police dispatching is that there is nothing routine.  Police calls change frequently simply due to the type of business.  A perceived cold call of “breaking and entering” into a property can quickly turn into an in-progress ”robbery” when it is discovered that a suspect is on the scene and has a weapon.  A report of an “assault” can quickly turn into an “active assailant (shooter)” situation, one of the most dangerous and complex types of incidents.  The constantly-changing...

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