In this newsletter: discussion of which Priority Dispatch System emergency dispatchers use to process traffic incident calls, opportunity to earn CDE on the subject, and research about how dispatching to a traffic accident can be as stressful as being in one.

TRAFFIC INCIDENT CALL PROCESSING.

Traffic incidents (collisons and crashes) are among the most common call types handled by Emergency Communication Centers (ECCs). These calls are also among the most complex call types because they represent such a range of possible situations. Many ECCs use multiple Priority Dispatch Systems (MPDS®, PPDS®, FPDS®) and each system contains its own traffic and transportation incident protocol.

New research from Chris Knight, identifies which of the three systems agencies use (or use first) in processing traffic incidents and what their reasons are for their selections.

INSIDER TIP: When reading a research paper, read the “Abstract” to get a nice summary of the study. Then skip/scroll down to the “Conclusion” to read the takeaway.

Click on Chris’ picture for all his research published in AEDR.

Chris Knight (USA)
Chief of Program Management & Implementations, Priority Dispatch Corp.™

Chris served in the Florida Highway Patrol for 29 years, as Colonel for about 7 years. He believes in officer courtesy, office and caller safety, and evidence-based policy.

GET SOME CDE ON THE TOPIC.

Take an Advancement Series course in English on the College of Emergency Dispatch to learn more about the PPDS® Traffic/Transportation (Crash) Protocol v5.0 and earn 2 hrs of CDE.

IS DISPATCHING TO A TRAFFIC ACCIDENT AS STRESSFUL AS BEING IN ONE?

A 2015 study identifies emergency dispatchers as an at-risk population for stress-induced psychopathology and are good candidates for preventative and therapeutic interventions.

In other words, their job provides exposure to potentially traumatic events at high rates, while being required to communicate with frantic and panicked callers while remaining calm and suppressing emotional reactions during the event (emotional labor). This may lead to burnout, Acute Stress Disorder, Secondary Traumatic Stress, and Occupational Burnout.

Listen to our podcast on emotional labor here.

Click here to access AEDR-published research articles and posters relating to emergency dispatcher stress and trauma.

Travel safely,

AEDR Editorial Team

We keep your fingers on the pulse of emergency dispatch and response.