The “Four-Second Rule” for Identifying the Active Silent 911 Caller

With advances in wireless technology, the volume of unintentional calls, or misdials, to 911 call centers has steadily increased over the past 10 years. While call centers have been working to manage call volume, there is very little systematic research on how to develop policy for handling Active Silent calls where callers may be unable to verbally communicate. s: The primary objective in this study was to first establish how dispatchers manage nuisance calls, and then provide a systematic way of determining how dispatchers can maximize their opportunities...

Read More

Multi-Protocol Discipline Agencies Use Different Protocols To Process Traffic Accidents

Traffic incidents (collisions and crashes) are among the most common call types handled by Emergency Communication Centers (ECCs). They are also among the most complex call types because they represent such a range of possible situations. ECCs that handle calls in multiple disciplines (medical, fire, and law enforcement) may have multiple protocols available for handling traffic incidents because the Medical Priority Dispatch System, Police Priority Dispatch System, and Fire Priority Dispatch System each contains its own traffic and transportation incident protocol....

Read More

Evaluation Variability Of Emergency Medical Calls Among Emergency Medical Communication Centers In Liguria, Italy

The evaluation of emergency calls received by Emergency Medical Communication Centers (EMCCs) is the first and basic step for activating the chain of survival. It also represents an essential prerequisite for optimal response to and management of critical patients. : The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the introduction of a single, structured, and standardized emergency medical dispatch system provided a more uniform evaluation of all emergency calls among five EMCCs in Liguria, Italy. Methods: The study retrospectively examined the assigned...

Read More

Weapons Reported On-Scene by Callers to Emergency Police Dispatch

Providing information about possible weapons on scene is an essential objective of police dispatching and clearly valuable to officer safety. However, up to now, no information has been available about how often callers report weapons as “involved or mentioned” in an incident, what types of weapons are most commonly reported, or which incident types most commonly have reported weapons associated with them. : The primary objective of this study is to determine which types of weapons are reported most often and on which Police Priority Dispatch System (PPDS®)...

Read More

Assessing the Impact of Opening Greetings in Handling Emergency Calls: Genova 118 Experience

The manner in which calls are handled at the emergency telecommunication center has a significant role in effective management of assistance on the scene. The main information needed to start a response is the location of the incident, which usually means the complete address. The Genova 118 Center has recently modified its standard greeting from “Genova 118” (STD1) to “Genova 118, where do I send the ambulance?” (STD2). s: To verify whether the new standard reduces the time needed to acquire a complete address during an emergency call. Methods: The...

Read More

Differences in PTSD Symptomatology Between Combat Veterans and Emergency Dispatchers

The current study examines posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters in the context of indirect exposure and compares symptom expression between emergency dispatchers and veterans. Given that a dispatcher’s job is inherently different from that of our military, it would be expected that their PTSD symptoms are different as well. : Understanding differences in presenting PTSD symptoms in emergency dispatchers relative to a group of veterans for the purposes of providing insight into prevention and treatment. We hypothesized that emergency dispatchers...

Read More

Characteristics of Acute Myocardial Infarction Cases Coded as Low-Acuity at Dispatch

The objectives of this study were to compare hospital-confirmed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) outcomes with emergency medical dispatch (EMD) low acuity cases and to identify any common characteristics of the AMIs assigned to those low-acuity codes. Methods: This was a retrospective study utilizing EMD, emergency medical services (EMS), and hospital discharge datasets, collected at two emergency communication centers in Salt Lake County, Utah. The study sample included all hospital-confirmed medical cases that arrived to the hospital via EMS. Primary outcome measures...

Read More

Effects of a Prehospital Emergency Care System on the Treatment and Prognosis of Stroke Patients

We sought to study a recently implemented prehospital emergency care system and its effects on the treatment level and prognosis of stroke patients. Prior to the introduction of the new system, no dispatch triage or prehospital care was available, and most patients accessed emergency care directly, without calling an emergency number. Methods: From April 2014 to March 2015,, at our associate hospital’s emergency department, 325 first-time acute stroke patients were admitted to the emergency department. This cohort was divided according to hospital admission method. The...

Read More

Comparison of Emergency Medical Dispatcher Stroke Identification and Paramedic On-Scene Stroke Assessment

Some have argued that there is no need for a dispatcher stroke evaluation because emergency medical services (EMS) responders can perform a more detailed, in-person stroke evaluation in the field. In fact, little or no research exists to determine whether dispatch stroke evaluations are actually redundant when compared with EMS field responder assessments. : The purpose of this study is to determine whether some strokes identified by emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) are not identified by field paramedics. Methods: The descriptive study utilized data from...

Read More

Characterization of Hospital-Confirmed Stroke Evidence for Callers Who Were Unable to Complete Stroke Test Requests from the Emergency Medical Dispatcher

The findings of a recent study suggest that a patient’s inability to complete all three tasks in a stroke identification tool used by Emergency Medical Dispatchers (EMDs) is a uniquely strong predictor of stroke. s: To examine the characteristics of the 17 cases in which the patient was unable to complete all three tasks in the Stroke Diagnostic Tool (SDxT). Methods: The retrospective descriptive study utilized stroke data from three sources in Salt Lake County, Utah, USA—Emergency Medical Dispatch, emergency medical services (EMS), and receiving hospitals—for...

Read More

Join the AEDR Newsletter