Author: jeff-j-clawson-md

Multi-Protocol Discipline Agencies Use Different Protocols To Process Traffic Accidents

Traffic incidents (collisions and crashes) are among the most common call types handled by Emergency Communication Centers (ECCs). They are also among the most complex call types because they represent such a range of possible situations. ECCs that handle calls in multiple disciplines (medical, fire, and law enforcement) may have multiple protocols available for handling traffic incidents because the Medical Priority Dispatch System, Police Priority Dispatch System, and Fire Priority Dispatch System each contains its own traffic and transportation incident protocol....

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Weapons Reported On-Scene by Callers to Emergency Police Dispatch

Providing information about possible weapons on scene is an essential objective of police dispatching and clearly valuable to officer safety. However, up to now, no information has been available about how often callers report weapons as “involved or mentioned” in an incident, what types of weapons are most commonly reported, or which incident types most commonly have reported weapons associated with them. : The primary objective of this study is to determine which types of weapons are reported most often and on which Police Priority Dispatch System (PPDS®)...

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Time-to-First-Compression and Barriers to Dispatch-Assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Rapid identification of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and delivery of bystander chest compressions in patients with ventricular fibrillation are key elements in the chain of survival. The timeliness of dispatcher-assisted CPR may improve survival in such patients. The Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS©) has recently introduced a streamlined process for emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) that provides early identification of OHCA and rapid delivery of chest compression instructions in version 13.0, known as the Obviously Not Breathing...

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Characteristics of Acute Myocardial Infarction Cases Coded as Low-Acuity at Dispatch

The objectives of this study were to compare hospital-confirmed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) outcomes with emergency medical dispatch (EMD) low acuity cases and to identify any common characteristics of the AMIs assigned to those low-acuity codes. Methods: This was a retrospective study utilizing EMD, emergency medical services (EMS), and hospital discharge datasets, collected at two emergency communication centers in Salt Lake County, Utah. The study sample included all hospital-confirmed medical cases that arrived to the hospital via EMS. Primary outcome measures...

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Comparison of Emergency Medical Dispatcher Stroke Identification and Paramedic On-Scene Stroke Assessment

Some have argued that there is no need for a dispatcher stroke evaluation because emergency medical services (EMS) responders can perform a more detailed, in-person stroke evaluation in the field. In fact, little or no research exists to determine whether dispatch stroke evaluations are actually redundant when compared with EMS field responder assessments. : The purpose of this study is to determine whether some strokes identified by emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) are not identified by field paramedics. Methods: The descriptive study utilized data from...

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