Annals of Emergency Dispatch & Response Logo

Meghan Broadbent, MS

ABILITY OF LAYPERSON CALLERS TO APPLY A TOURNIQUET FOLLOWING PROTOCOL-BASED INSTRUCTIONS FROM AN EMERGENCY MEDICAL DISPATCHER

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Paul Stiegler, MD, Dr. Mark Conrad Fivaz, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

The overall objective of the study was to determine whether layperson callers can effectively stop simulated bleeding using an improvised or a commercial tourniquet, when provided with scripted instructions via phone from a trained protocol-aided EMD.

Read more

Situational Awareness in Emergency Medical Dispatch

Isabel Gardett, PhD, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD, Madison Bramwell, MEd

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Situational awareness (SA, also called situation awareness) is the ability to take in relevant information about an event in order to understand it and take effective action. Maintaining effective SA as an emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) may be more difficult than in other, similarly complex roles because of the remote nature of an emergency call for help.

Read more

IS EMD LOW-ACUITY CODE SELECTION INFLUENCED BY A SOFTWARE MODIFICATION?

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Bryon Schultz, BA, Lisa Burnette, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Sick Person (Specific Diagnosis) is one of the most commonly used Chief Complaint Protocols in the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS). This protocol is often used when a caller does not report any specific or high-priority symptoms. Of particular concern is the 26-ALPHA-1 determinant code, which refers to a person with “No priority symptoms” and none of the specific symptoms listed on the ALPHA-code drop-down list (Fig. 1).

Read more

CHARACTERISTICS OF HOSPITAL-CONFIRMED ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION CASES CODED AS LOW-ACUITY AT DISPATCH

Christopher Olola, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death worldwide, with ischemic heart disease (IHD) causing nearly nine million deaths per year. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is estimated to cause about one-third of all deaths in people over 35 years old, and the incidence of CHD is expected to continue to rise. Acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs)—heart attacks—represent a significant portion of this overall CHD mortality, with approximately 620,000 Americans suffering a first heart attack, and 295,000 suffering a repeat event, each year.

Read more

PERSONS DESCRIPTIONS REPORTED TO EMERGENCY POLICE DISPATCH

Meghan Broadbent, MS, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Chris Knight, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Christopher Olola, PhD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Identification of persons based on verbal descriptions is one of the key skills of police work. This includes identifying suspects, but also locating missing persons, identifying a person needing help in a public assist call, or finding and helping a person who is threatening suicide. Correct identification can lead to reduced loss of life, reunions of missing persons with their loved ones, and apprehension of suspects, while incorrect identification can have terrible unintended consequences for both officers and civilians.

Read more

Emergency Medical Dispatch Identification of Opioid Overdose and Frequency of Naloxone Administration on Scene

Richard E. Lindfors, NRP, EMD-Q, Byron Shultz, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Rob Lawrence, Danny Garrison, Shannon Smith, Todd Stout, Marc Gay, Mike Taigman, MS, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Christopher Olola, PhD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Original Research

Opioid overdoses have reached crisis proportions. One response has been to increase the availability of naloxone HCl (commonly referred to by the generic name naloxone), which reverses the effects of opioid overdose. The Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®) includes instructions by which the Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) can prompt the caller to find and use naloxone on overdose victims. However, these instructions are only provided on dispatch Chief Complaint (CC) Protocols on which overdoses are expected to be handled...

Read more

Situational Awareness in Emergency Medical Dispatch: An Observation Study and Proposed Model

Isabel Gardett, PhD, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Original Research

Situational awareness (SA, also called situation awareness) is the ability to take in relevant information about an event in order to understand it and take effective action. Maintaining effective SA as an emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) may be more difficult than in other, similarly complex roles because of the remote nature of an emergency call for help. This study attempts to provide insight on one remote SA situation by reporting on a simulation study in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructions were provided over...

Read more

Barriers Significantly Influence Time to Bystander Compressions in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Christopher Olola, PhD

Apr 09, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 1|Original Research

Rapid identification of sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and delivery of bystander chest compressions in patients with ventricular fibrillation are key elements in the chain of survival. However, time to bystander compressions can be greatly affected by a wide variety of barriers, some beyond an EMD's control. The aim of this study is to identify and quantify the impact that barriers have on the time taken to achieve bystander compressions for suspected OHCAs. This retrospective, quantitative cohort...

Read more

Predicting the Need for Extrication in Traffic Accidents Reported to 911: Is Anyone Pinned/Trapped?

Chris Davis, EMD-I, Paige Dodson, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Chad Pore, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Christopher Olola, PhD

Dec 04, 2018|AEDR 2018 Vol. 6 Issue 3|Original Research

Extrication activities at the scene of motor vehicle accidents (MVA) result in extended scene times and increase morbidity and mortality. Identifying the need for extrication-capable resources during the 911 call-taking process, and dispatching them without delay, is crucial to delivering the required response and patient care. Determining the need for extrication using the Traffic/Transport Incidents Protocol in the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®) (version 13.0 ©2000-2015, Priority Dispatch, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA)...

Read more

Implications of Pre-Alerts for Medical Emergency Calls

Dawn Faudere, EMT-P, EMD-Q, Jeff Hutchens, EMT-P, EMD-I, EFD-I, ETC-I, Christopher Olola, PhD, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Isabel Gardett, PhD

Dec 04, 2018|AEDR 2018 Vol. 6 Issue 3|Original Research

In emergency dispatching, pre-alerts are used to send responders to calls prior to getting a final dispatch code. Some studies have showed that pre-alerts can effectively reduce dispatch time for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, potentially improving overall patient outcome. However, there is also a potential risk in running lights-and-siren on non-fully triaged calls. Although pre-alerts have been used for several years, no research studies have demonstrated its benefit, in general. The goal of this study was to determine...

Read more