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Daniel Ashwood, PhD

ABILITY OF LAYPERSON CALLERS TO APPLY A TOURNIQUET FOLLOWING PROTOCOL-BASED INSTRUCTIONS FROM AN EMERGENCY MEDICAL DISPATCHER

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Paul Stiegler, MD, Dr. Mark Conrad Fivaz, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

The overall objective of the study was to determine whether layperson callers can effectively stop simulated bleeding using an improvised or a commercial tourniquet, when provided with scripted instructions via phone from a trained protocol-aided EMD.

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Caller’s Ability to Understand “Responding Normally” vs. “Completely Alert” Key Question

Valeria De Cassia Pereira, RN, EMD-QI, Sara Scott, Maristela Uta Nakano, MD, MBA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Irena Weight, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Edward Trefts, MFA, Brett Patterson, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Anecdotally, numerous MPDS® (Priority Dispatch Corp., Salt Lake City, Utah, USA)-user agencies in the USA, Canada, UK, and Brazil have reported that the emergency caller has difficulty understanding the key question (KQ) “Is s/he completely alert?”

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Falls Protocol Lift Assist Calls: Predictors of Repeat 911 Calls

Lee Van Vleet, Marty Gray, BS, EMD-Q, Dawn Faudere, EMT-P, EMD-Q, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Alissa Wheeler, BA, Christopher Olola, PhD

Oct 01, 2020|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 2|Original Research

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) regularly respond to lift assist calls. Previous studies have shown lift assist calls present a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. This group of callers is also likely to make repeated calls to 911 for EMS assistance. The ability to foresee which of these patients may need to call 911 again within 24 hours could help decrease the risk posed to patients in these situations. To describe calls originating as lift assist calls with repeat calls within 24 hours, explore the...

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Measuring the Impact of Training on Emergency Medical Dispatcher Management of General Mental Crisis Calls and Suicide Calls

Jim Marshall, MA, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Angie Fox, Jim Soukup

May 29, 2020|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 1|Original Research

Historically, 911 professionals have not received specialized training in dispatch and call management related to mental crises and suicidality. This lack of training may contribute to lack of confidence and elevated anxiety in successfully handling these call types. A new model of training, Emergency Mental Health Dispatching™ (EMHD), which aims to equip 911 professionals to manage these calls has been developed to address this need. The objective of this case study was to measure the impact of EMHD via two specific aims. The first aim...

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Connecting the Practice of Emergency Dispatch with the Communities it Services: Hypothesis Generation and Lessons Learned

Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Alissa Wheeler, BA, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Jennifer Hurst

Mar 14, 2020|Research Posters

The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) exists with a mission to advance and support emergency dispatch professionals and match callers in need of emergency, health, and social services safely, quickly, and effectively with the most appropriate response. Therefore, IAED sets the highest possible standards for emergency dispatching worldwide through conducting research, creating protocols, designing training, offering professional development opportunities and certification for emergency dispatchers, and publications on the trade and science of emergency dispatch...

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Caller's Ability to Understand "Responding Normally" vs. "Completely Alert" Key Question in a Brazilian Portuguese Version of an Emergency Medical Dispatch Protocol

Valeria De Cassia Pereira, RN, EMD-QI, Sara Scott, Maristela Uta Nakano, MD, MBA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Irena Weight, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Edward Trefts, MFA, Brett Patterson, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Original Research

Alertness is important to assess during many medical emergencies; however, assessing alertness proves difficult in a non-visual emergency dispatch environment. Little is understood about how to best gather an accurate report of patient alertness during an interaction between callers and Emergency Medical Dispatchers (EMDs). The primary objective of the study was to compare two versions of a Key Question (KQ) intended to gain an accurate report of alertness, to determine whether either demonstrates a higher degree of caller...

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