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Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS

ABILITY OF LAYPERSON CALLERS TO APPLY A TOURNIQUET FOLLOWING PROTOCOL-BASED INSTRUCTIONS FROM AN EMERGENCY MEDICAL DISPATCHER

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Paul Stiegler, MD, Dr. Mark Conrad Fivaz, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

The overall objective of the study was to determine whether layperson callers can effectively stop simulated bleeding using an improvised or a commercial tourniquet, when provided with scripted instructions via phone from a trained protocol-aided EMD.

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Caller’s Ability to Understand “Responding Normally” vs. “Completely Alert” Key Question

Valeria De Cassia Pereira, RN, EMD-QI, Sara Scott, Maristela Uta Nakano, MD, MBA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Irena Weight, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Edward Trefts, MFA, Brett Patterson, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Anecdotally, numerous MPDS® (Priority Dispatch Corp., Salt Lake City, Utah, USA)-user agencies in the USA, Canada, UK, and Brazil have reported that the emergency caller has difficulty understanding the key question (KQ) “Is s/he completely alert?”

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IS EMD LOW-ACUITY CODE SELECTION INFLUENCED BY A SOFTWARE MODIFICATION?

Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Bryon Schultz, BA, Lisa Burnette, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Sick Person (Specific Diagnosis) is one of the most commonly used Chief Complaint Protocols in the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS). This protocol is often used when a caller does not report any specific or high-priority symptoms. Of particular concern is the 26-ALPHA-1 determinant code, which refers to a person with “No priority symptoms” and none of the specific symptoms listed on the ALPHA-code drop-down list (Fig. 1).

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IMPACT OF IMPLEMENTING THE MEDICAL TRANSFER PROTOCOL SUITE™ (MTPS™)

Ivan Whitaker, MBA, Darren Judd, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD, Alissa Wheeler, BA

Aug 04, 2021|Research Posters

Emergency communication centers often field a large number of calls requesting transportation for patients from one care facility to another. Transferring patients between facilities can be frustrating for nearly everyone, including care facility staff, emergency dispatchers, communication center leaders, and responders.

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Are You with the Patient Now? Distribution of EMD Calls by Caller-Party Type

Bryon Schultz, BA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD

Oct 28, 2020|Research Posters

Caller-party type may determine the accuracy of the information collected by the EMD. Has this distribution changed in the past decade? Are EMD’s gathering more accurate information? And why is the caller party dynamic changing? The objective is to retrospectively look at the distribution of the caller-party type in a mostly urban/suburban, high performance EMS system. ProQA data from 2004 to 2017 was extracted and evaluated to identify any trends. This was a retrospective, descriptive, and uncontrolled study of de-identified medical dispatch data, collected using ProQA data from an...

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Identifying Working Structure Fires Using a Standardized Fire Dispatch Protocol System

Terry Purvis, ENP, EMD, EPD, EFD, EPD-Q, Chris Davis, EMD-I, Madeline R. Marks, MS, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Stewart Mcgehee, EMT-P, EMD, BS, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD

Oct 01, 2020|AEDR 2020 Vol. 8 Issue 2|Original Research

Structure fires, although infrequent, require significant resources and personnel to effectively complete critical tasks in a short time frame to achieve positive outcomes. While it is important to dispatch the appropriate number of resources rapidly, there is a risk to over-allocate responding resources both to the public and to the responders by responding with lights and siren. A standardized emergency fire dispatch (EFD) protocol-based system is important to quickly identify working structures fires so appropriate resources are allocated in an effective manner...

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Correlation of Emergency Medical Dispatch Traffic/Transportation Incidents to On-Scene Outcomes

Jenna B. Streeter, MPA, ENP, Alissa Wheeler, BA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Christopher Olola, PhD

Mar 04, 2020|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 3|Original Research

Research on motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) is robust, though most focuses on prevention and treatment. Emergency medical experts now recognize telecommunications' vital role in the chain of survival; however, MVA research on telecommunicator impact on the MVA is limited. This study seeks to address that gap in research, examining the relationship between Emergency Medical Dispatch codes and on-scene findings. The objective of the study was to characterize all cases (based on determinant codes) triaged using the Medical Priority...

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THE EVOLUTION OF MPDS® PROTOCOL–38 ADVANCED SEND: RESEARCH-BASED PROPOSALS FOR CHANGE AND TRAINING ENHANCEMENTS

Bonni Stockman, Darren Judd, Alissa Wheeler, BA, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS

Oct 31, 2019|Research Posters

Emergency communication centers often field calls from police, local law enforcement, sheriff, state police, highway patrol, security, military police, or federal agents. When these officers radio their communication centers for medical assistance, historically, they have said "Send medical" or "Need paramedics." Centers have typically sent lights-and-siren responses, sometimes wasting resources and potentially causing more accidents. It can be frustrating for all parties involved, because officers are not trained to provide necessary patient information, emergency dispatchers must triage...

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Caller's Ability to Understand "Responding Normally" vs. "Completely Alert" Key Question in a Brazilian Portuguese Version of an Emergency Medical Dispatch Protocol

Valeria De Cassia Pereira, RN, EMD-QI, Sara Scott, Maristela Uta Nakano, MD, MBA, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Christopher Olola, PhD, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Irena Weight, Daniel Ashwood, PhD, Edward Trefts, MFA, Brett Patterson, Jeff J. Clawson, MD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Original Research

Alertness is important to assess during many medical emergencies; however, assessing alertness proves difficult in a non-visual emergency dispatch environment. Little is understood about how to best gather an accurate report of patient alertness during an interaction between callers and Emergency Medical Dispatchers (EMDs). The primary objective of the study was to compare two versions of a Key Question (KQ) intended to gain an accurate report of alertness, to determine whether either demonstrates a higher degree of caller...

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Emergency Medical Dispatch Identification of Opioid Overdose and Frequency of Naloxone Administration on Scene

Richard E. Lindfors, NRP, EMD-Q, Byron Shultz, Greg Scott, MBA, EMD-QI, Isabel Gardett, PhD, Meghan Broadbent, MS, Srilakshmi Sangaraju, MS, Rob Lawrence, Danny Garrison, Shannon Smith, Todd Stout, Marc Gay, Mike Taigman, MS, Jeff J. Clawson, MD, Christopher Olola, PhD

Aug 13, 2019|AEDR 2019 Vol. 7 Issue 2|Original Research

Opioid overdoses have reached crisis proportions. One response has been to increase the availability of naloxone HCl (commonly referred to by the generic name naloxone), which reverses the effects of opioid overdose. The Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®) includes instructions by which the Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) can prompt the caller to find and use naloxone on overdose victims. However, these instructions are only provided on dispatch Chief Complaint (CC) Protocols on which overdoses are expected to be handled...

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